Skip to main content

The Divine Comedy

Audio Preview

audio
The Divine Comedy


Publication date 2007-01-20
LibriVox recording of The Divine Comedy, by Dante Alighieri. Translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened “Divina” by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, the last great work of literature of the Middle Ages and the first great work of the Renaissance. A culmination of the medieval world-view of the afterlife, it establishes the Tuscan dialect in which it is written as the Italian standard, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature.

The Divine Comedy is composed of three canticas (or “cantiche”) — Inferno (Hell), Purgatorio (Purgatory), and Paradiso (Paradise) — composed each of 33 cantos (or “canti”). The very first canto serves as an introduction to the poem and is generally not considered to be part of the first cantica, bringing the total number of cantos to 100.
The poet tells in the first person his travel through the three realms of the dead, lasting during the Easter Triduum in the spring of 1300.

For further information, including links to online text, reader information, RSS feeds, CD cover or other formats or languages (if available), please go to the LibriVox catalog page for this recording.

For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.org.

Download M4B (87MB)

comment
Reviews

Reviewer: mandy szostek - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - June 19, 2017
Subject: dante
the reader of track number 12 is a wonderful reader.
it's amazing to hear the different volunteers
Reviewer: elementssafilipino - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - November 12, 2016
Subject: Dante I love you
I loved
Reviewer: Donald R Miller - favoritefavoritefavorite - November 18, 2013
Subject: Truly a Paradiso-to-Inferno Experience
The Purgatorio Version of the Comedy:
Many readers with many levels of heavenish to hellish degrees of quality await you in this community recording. Some of Librivox's best talent are here, along with truly cringe-worthy performances.

If Librivox had only thought to have their better (or in the case of a classic like this, their best) talent read a section each-- one inferno, another purgatorio, and another paradiso.
DOWNLOAD OPTIONS
Uploaded by
librivoxbooks
on 1/20/2007
Views
812,401
Favorites
52
Reviews
3
SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata)
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Dante Alighieri
audio
eye 38,521
favorite 6
comment 0
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by John Donne
audio
eye 8,926
favorite 2
comment 0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by John Cleland
audio
eye 675,129
favorite 30
comment 1
favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 1 reviews )
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Kate Chopin
audio
eye 315,541
favorite 20
comment 0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Various
audio
eye 152,841
favorite 3
comment 0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Andrew Murray
audio
eye 33,861
favorite 5
comment 2
favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 2 reviews )
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by American Bible Union
audio
eye 69,576
favorite 4
comment 1
favoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 1 reviews )
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Upton Sinclair
audio
eye 12,895
favorite 4
comment 1
favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 1 reviews )
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Mary Baker Eddy
audio
eye 9,933
favorite 3
comment 1
favorite ( 1 reviews )
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Saint John of Damascus
audio
eye 6,812
favorite 6
comment 0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text